The Curse of Over-engineering

We have two half days (affectionately known as Freaky Fridays) at work a month, where we get to work on our own projects or explore something new. Yesterday was dedicated to exploring Angular 2.

I thought that it might be a good opportunity to test it out in a real-world application – my Flashcards app to help me learn Swedish vocabulary.

The syntax isn’t too dissimilar from AngularJS, but rather is abstracted in more boilerplate code. Getting a basic app going, by following the Quickstart Guide, wasn’t too difficult.

“Look at where you have to be.”

Then, there was a knock at the door. It was Earl, the Grim Reaper of Over-Engineering. He asked me to remember that I am a software engineer and that everything has to be TIP TOP from build one.

So, the curse kicked in and I started scrambling to get the basic setup working with Webpack. I tried cramming in a Webpack tutorial, alongside the Angular 2 tutorial. Soon, it just became about cursing the day Webpack was built and racing through Stackoverflow, hoping someone else wrote something to make everything PERFECT now.

10 minutes before the end of the day, I realized… wait.

The goal was to learn Angular 2 and use it to build an app.

That’s it.

I told Earl that there was another engineer across the street, about to do something simple. He scurried away.

I gutted out the Webpack configuration and stuck with the lite-server package suggested in the Quickstart guide.

Moral of the story: fuck Earl and fuck over-engineering.

 

My Strained Relationship with Software Development

I wrote the original version of this piece, last year on Medium. This is an expanded and less guarded take.

I didn’t want to study software engineering in college. I first wanted to study English literature and drama. That wasn’t an option at home. So, I looked at the other things I had dreamed about since childhood – architecture. I put together a portfolio and applied to Bartlett School of Architecture in London. They hid the rejection letter from me and told me no. So, I fought them and the first compromise was computer-aided product design. I just wanted some art in whatever I studied.

There was none of that. It was all math, physics, and science.

Continue reading My Strained Relationship with Software Development

The #100DaysOfCode Challenge

I’ll be starting this challenge tomorrow (Wednesday). I must admit that I feel a certain amount of professional shame by doing it, but there’s a conjoined sense of need to do so, too.

I’m at an uncomfortable juncture in my professional life as a developer. I have a whole lot of years of experience, but I look at job descriptions and I feel like that experience don’t align with them. It’s like that dream of showing up naked at your final high school exam, but you’re awake and it’s not a dream.

I didn’t make the right choices over the last 6 years in staying current with the latest technologies and picking the companies that would have ensured the right development of my craft. It’s uncomfortable and unavoidable.

So, doing this challenge for 100 days, along with working on my own app projects, is a way to get back on track.

Been in my situation? Mentored or known someone who has? I’d love to hear your pick-me-uppers in the comments!